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Attention Drone Operators FAA sends a message with the $200,000 fine

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So You got yourself a drone for Christmas. Plan on taking some beautiful pictures, making a hobby of aerial videography. That’s great like most drone operators quite a few have no idea of what the rules and regulations are. They are quite simple. There are different classifications of airspace class B class C. Class C is above 4000 feet class B is of course much lower, but nevertheless, it is on the perimeter of an airport. A company by the name of Sky Pan was issued a penalty reached Via a settlement for violating FAA regulations. It seems this company had allegedly flown drones over places like Central Park in New York.

The problem is that this is congested airspace and is restricted. If you have just purchased a drone and want all the rules and regulations aware you can safely fly it there is a website you can visit called http://knowbeforeyoufly.org You also need to register your drone with the FAA and have the sticker attached to your drone.

There are more drones in the air than ever before, and the FAA is clamping down on operators that fly irresponsibly. Remember one thing; a drone maybe a toy however if it hits a car a person or a house you will be held responsible. So ownership of the drone must be taken seriously. Sky Pan and the FAA has settled this issue and also agrees to support the FAA and commit to providing some public service commercials. The fact of the matter is even though a commercial or private plane may be well above the 400-foot allowance for a drone by the FAA if you are in class B airspace even flying as high as 40 feet would not be allowed. So keep that in mind if you live in or around class B airspace and just want to hover around her neighborhood. This would simply just be a no-no. Check the FAA websites for more details and remember respect drone ownership. Not only can this cost used to penalties but other costly legal matters that can be avoided.

Sky Pan and the FAA has settled this issue and also agrees to support the FAA and commit to providing some public service commercials. The fact of the matter is even though a commercial or private plane may be well above the 400-foot allowance for a drone by the FAA if you are in class B airspace even flying as high as 40 feet would not be allowed. So keep that in mind if you live in or around class B airspace and just want to hover around her neighborhood. This would simply just be a no-no.

Check the FAA websites for more details and remember respect drone ownership. Not only can this cost used to penalties but other costly legal matters that can be avoided.